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Transgender Veteran: As compared to the U.S. military, Georgia has some catching up to do Dana Fuchko ~ Atlanta, Georgia
This Father’s Day, We’re Highlighting Four Two-Father Families, And What A Statewide Non-Discrimination Law Would Mean for Them June 15, 2017

Father’s Day is this Sunday, and to celebrate we’re telling the stories of four special families who have one thing in common—all are headed by two dads.

These dads exemplify what it means to be a father: They’re committed partners in parenting, who work hard to provide for their families. And they’re fiercely devoted to their kids.

But there’s one crucial difference: Because Georgia law lacks explicit, LGBT-inclusive non-discrimination protections, these fathers are more likely to face discrimination at work, in housing, and in public places. On top of that, they’ve had to work harder to access their rights as parents.

That’s why for Father’s Day, they deserve an especially big shout-out:

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Derek & Donnie Broussard-Cormier

Derek Broussard and Donnie Cormier have been together for 12 years. Four years ago, they officially tied the knot—and then completed their family by adopting their son, Dax, not long after.

Derek and Donnie feel the same joy all fathers feel watching their children grow. But for them, that joy is tempered by worry about barriers Dax might face because his parents are gay. Dax is four years old now, meaning soon he’ll leave their home for preschool and other public places where he, and his parents, can be legally discriminated against.

“Having non-discrimination protections for gay fathers would really provide peace of mind for our family and families just like ours.” –Derek Broussard

“Having non-discrimination protections for gay fathers would really provide peace of mind for our family and families just like ours,” Derek says, noting that although that hasn’t happened yet in Georgia, the introduction last year of bi-partisan legislation that would address anti-LGBT discrimination in Georgia gives him hope.

 

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Darryl Holloman & Glyn Williams

Darryl Holloman and Glyn Williams have been together for 23 years and married for four. They’re the parents of 7-year-old twin boys, Delbert and Delvin.

When Darryl talks publicly about his family, he knows people immediately focus on the big, obvious difference—that they’re two dads. But what he wants people to realize about that difference is that it’s only surface level. There’s much more that unites him and Glyn with the other fathers of the world.

“I think it is important to remember that we are not a ‘gay family’—we are just a family with two dads,” he says. “We simply want what all fathers want for our children: For them to have a great education, live in a safe neighborhood, have the freedom to make their own choices as they grow, and to live happy and productive lives.”

“I think it is important to remember that we are not a “gay family”—we are just a family with two dads.” –Darryl Holloman

But when both Darryl and Glyn can be legally targeted for discrimination, it makes achieving those goals for Delbert and Delvin so much harder.

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Rob and Clay Calhoun

Talking with their children about discrimination, the law, and what it means for their family is something same-sex parents all handle differently.

Some introduce the concept when their children are small. Others are forced to address it when something happens—like if a parent is discriminated against or fired from their job because they’re gay.

Rob and Clay Calhoun, who have careers in public education and corporate America, haven’t shied away from discussing discrimination with their two kids: Rainey, 14, and Jimmy, 11.

They really can’t shy away, because employment discrimination could affect their family at any time.

“Our two beloved kids are stunned that either of their parents can be legally fired from our jobs simply for being gay.” –Rob Calhoun.

“Our two beloved kids are stunned that either of their parents can be legally fired from our jobs simply for being gay,” Rob says. “Without statewide non-discrimination protections, this is a fact of life.”

***

Jim Bass and Ken Adcox

In 2007, Jim Bass and Ken Adcox of Alpharetta became the proud parents of a son, Aaron, who they adopted when he was 3 months old. Over the next several years, their family increased again, and again. After Aaron came Katie, and then Will.

Watch their story:

The pair had long had dreams of becoming parents. But as their lives changed with each new edition to their family, one thing stubbornly did not change: the law, under which they and their children can be discriminated against because Jim and Ken gay.

The pair are optimistic, though. Last year’s successful defense against anti-LGBT bills in the legislature, as well as the historic introduction of bills that would enact LGBT-inclusive civil rights protections, shows that public attitudes about LGBT discrimination can change just as fast as their family has.

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