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Their Marriage Is Equal Under Law, But LGBT Couple Still Face Discrimination Nancy & Stephanie

Nancy and Stephanie have experienced discrimination firsthand. After their marriage, Nancy and Stephanie wanted to update their wills to ensure the other would be protected from hardship if anything unexpected happened.

They were matched with a lawyer through Nancy’s employer, which she figured would be best since her employer is very supportive of its LGBT employees. So she was shocked when she called the lawyer, and he refused to work with her.

“He responded that he could not work with me as it was against his religious principles,” she says. “I was stunned. This is Atlanta in 2017!”

“He responded that he could not work with me as it was against his religious principles. I was stunned … this is Atlanta in 2017! So while we celebrate the SCOTUS marriage anniversary and all that means, I’m aware that additional protections still need to be in place for families like mine.” —Nancy Kropf

It was a rude awakening for Nancy that even though her and Stephanie have the legal protections of a married couple, they don’t yet have the full protection from discrimination that other Georgia residents enjoy.

“So while we celebrate the SCOTUS marriage anniversary and all that means,” Nancy says, “I’m aware that additional protections still need to be in place for families like mine.”

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"Ed Bastian, CEO of @Delta, who has been vocal about religious liberty legislation and making sure Georgia is a welcoming state to everyone, simply said: 'It was a good meeting.'" bit.ly/2OAzVd5 #GApol

About 2 days ago

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